Your location: Home > Home Page > Foot > footlocaltion > CMBC News > Media Focus

CMBC News

The Ways of Transformation for Chinese Commercial Banks

(The English version of this article has already been published under the name of How to Run a Bank on the 2013 Special Issue of The Banker, UK)
Mr. Dong Wenbiao, COB of CMBC

The fast development of interest rate liberalization and financial disintermediation in Chinese domestic financial market is posing severe challenges to the old business patterns that largely rely on large corporate and private customers. Chinese banks need to pace up business transformation to be able to cope with these challenges.
My personal thinking on the subject and CMBC’s practices tells me that the key to the transformation of Chinese banks lies in the transformation of financial service models, service targets and service approaches.

Transformation from traditional financial services to professional and comprehensive financial services
Traditionally, Chinese banks mainly serve large enterprises, especially, large state-owned enterprises. And accordingly, their services are primarily revolved on providing these large enterprises with deposit, loan and remittance supports. The problem is, however, such services rarely take the unique characteristics of customer industry, business and financial needs into consideration. In today’s market, it becomes very difficult for Chinese banks to sustain such a service model. General customers are trying to raise the interest rate on deposits and drive down the interest rate on loans, causing a sharp shrinkage in the interest spread available to Chinese banks. On the other hand, large enterprise customers turn to raise money in bond or security market, instead of directly coming to banks for credits. With this challenge standing right in the front, Chinese banks have to transform their financial service models to professionalized and integrated ones.
Today, most Chinese large enterprises have already grown into national organizations, the strong players in their industries. Consequently, Chinese banks need not only to provide these nationwide organizations with unified financial services, but also to develop for them tailored financial solutions in consistence with the specific characteristics of the industries in which they operate, not to mention the complex and diversified needs they have for settlement, bond issue, asset management, financial consultation, and so on and so forth. To meet these needs, Chinese banks will have to step into new business areas and enter into cooperative relations with other financial institutes to be able to provide customers with comprehensive financial services.

The experiences CMBC learnt in its practices indicate that we must step out of the ‘HQs-branch-subbranch’ management model and build a business-unit-based management system and create a service platform featuring professional and integrated financial services. This is exactly the start-point from which we could really transform the tradition financial service model. 
  
From large customers to SMEs 
Chinese has over 50 million small and micro enterprises (SMEs). But rarely have they had much experience of modern financial services. As financial disintermediation is developing in depth, Chinese banks have to develop new customer groups, e.g. small and micro enterprises. We believe that SMEs is the next blue ocean of banking business. Based on a USD 100,000 average credit need per SME, 50 million SMEs means an overall credit need of nearly USD 5 trillion. 
Considering the fact that each SME loan is no more than RMB 5 million (approximately USD 800,000), it is a remarkable achievement that CMBC can realize an accumulative SME loan balance of RMB 317 billion, or approximately USD 50 billion, in less than 4 years, to be exact, from February 2009 when CMBC launched its first SME loan service to the end of 2012. Judging by CMBC’s experiences, if a bank would want to achieve any success in developing SME financial business at all, it must make innovations in its business models first of all to solve the problem of ‘high cost and high risk’ in SME financial business. How to deal with the high cost? First, develop SME customers in batches, in places, CBDs or industry chains where SMEs cluster, instead of one by one; Second, group SMEs together in a sort of organization and provide them with credits collectively to save the cost of labor. How to cope with the high risk? First, provide a large group of SME customers with small SME loans, so that we may take advantage of the Law of Large Numbers in statistics to control the default probability and estimated loss rates; Second, the interest rate of SME loans must be kept at a high level, high enough to cover all the loss of defaults. 

In addition, as China is gearing up its industrialization and enterprise congregation processes, industrial congregations and even industrial clusters have already emerged in many regions in China. Most of such industrial clusters are made up of SMEs. Chinese banks might just as well set up special SME financial businesses to improve their performance in providing professional SME financial services in response this tendency. 
  
From individual customers to industrial-chain-oriented financing services 
It is anticipated that industrial restructuring shall remain the key note of Chinese economic development in the next decade. What Chinese banks really need to do, therefore, is to take part in the process or, more specifically, integrate their business with various industrial consolidation and upgrading initiatives and, thereby, secure the space for their future development. And the key to such integration is to transform their financial service models, to move on from individual-customer-oriented services to the entire industry, to the industrial-chain-oriented financial services. 
In China, many industries have huge market size to deal with, for example, clothing industry, marine fishery, tea industry, liquor industry and stone material industry. The financial resources available to them, however, have never been adequate. In fact, financial supports from Chinese banks have always been beyond reach to most enterprises operating in these industries. It must be pointed out that the development, consolidation and upgrading of these industries are an essential part of China’s industrial structure adjustment. All these industries have one thing in common: coexistence of a few core enterprises, a large number of small and medium enterprises in their upstream and downstream and SMEs. If Chinese banks should focus their resources on a few core enterprises only, they’d simply fail their mission of supporting the overall development of Chinese industries. To do so, they need to turn away from those core enterprises and start serving entire industrial chains. They need to design and implement different financial products and services in line with the specific conditions of different links in an industrial chain to be able to promote the development of every participant in the industry, be it SMEs, small, medium or large, and then the general development of the entire industry. Only in this way can Chinese banks control the risks to which they are exposed and secure a huge space for future development. 

Over the past two years, CMBC has already established a Stone Material Finance SBU, a Marine Fishery Finance Center, a Tea Sector Finance Center and a Chinese Liquor Finance Center to provide relevant industries with specialized full-industrial-chain financial services. And all of them have achieved a rapid growth and a remarkable ROE.

 


© Copyright CHINA MINSHENG BANK